A newish Napoleonic Bavarian Battalion

It is with a degree of frustration that von Peter himself finally presents his latest addition to his Napoleonic forces of war.

At Schloss von Peter there was a dedicated war gaming room – The Bastion – with effectively a permanently setup gaming table and halogen lighting added in the ceilings as a Christmas or Birthday present. With such a set up even von Peter himself learned where to place figures to photograph them so as to make the best of the lighting. Now resident at Neu Schloss von Peter such luxurious facilities are a thing of the past and photography is a little more challenging. As proof von Peter himself offers up the following photos of the latest battalion to answer the summons to war – the Bavarian 2/3 Prinz Carl Infantry Regiment of the Napoleonic period.

bavarian-2-3-prnz-carl-ir-2Credits:

  • Figures from Front Rank Figurines
  • coloured pigments applied by Nigel Fun-nell
  • flag provisioned by GMB Designs
  • horse painting, flag raising, figure selection, figure choreography and basing by von Peter himself

bavarian-2-3-prnz-carl-ir

One more battalion of Bavarian line infantry to go and the original plan for the Bavarians – Generalmajor Beckers brigade of Generallieutenant Raglovich’s 29th (Bavarian) Division  from XII Corps: Marshal Oudinot XII Corps circa 1813 – will be complete.

Complicating the situation is of course The son & heir. Of course! 😀 Several years ago the young man decided that he wanted to paint some Bavarians. So some Bavarians were requisitioned from Front Rank for him. He painted a battalion before deciding that painting Napoleonics would drive him crazy(er!). This battalion – 2/7 Infantry Regiment – regularly takes the field with the Bavarians of von Peter himself but the unpainted – a battalion or two of infantry, a battery and a Chevauleger regiment – remain in the unpigmented metal reserves of Neu Schloss von Peter. One suspects that in the fullness of time these figures will get the pigmentation treatment and prepare to do ‘that’ Emperor’s bidding.

Please do not be forgetting to click on the photos for a larger and clearer image.

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself

For Napoleonic Austrian modellers, painters and appreciators

The Bavarian battalion is finished … has been for a while … but it hasn’t been photographed. Bad von Peter himself. The following public service announcement has been patiently waiting for those blasted Bavarians for quite a while.  It has been decided to release it on its own to a world that probably knows all about it by now. Mutter mutter.

austrians-hold-the-village

Above: brave Austrian infantry setting the scene by holding a village in a game from February 2007! The stacked orange chairs give a burning glow to the scene. Front Rank figures from von Peter’s private collection, painted by Nigel Funnell. Buildings created by Rhys.

The History Book Man have released another e-book in their ARMIES AND UNIFORMS of the Napoleonic Wars series. And this time the country of focus is one of the heavy weights of the Napoleonic Wars. Their latest e-book is titled The Austro-Hungarian Army 1792-1814.

At over 440 pages and containing many colour images this is a far cry from an earlier monochrome well worn version that von Peter himself purchased many decades ago. That earlier version remained a treasured resource and this one is so much more. For von Peter himself truly are these e-books wonderful references in of themselves but for a measly £3.99 they are one of life’s genuine bargains.

The release blurb …

The Austro-Hungarian Army was engaged continually against the armies of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire from 1792 until after the Battle of Waterloo and Bonaparte’s final defeat and exile in 1815. For twenty years the Austrian army shouldered the greater part of the war on land against France being actively at war for some 108 months more than twice the war commitment against France of either Prussia or Russia.

The first edition of this small work was originally published in 1977 which was a compilation of a number of earlier booklets and privately commissioned research papers first published in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The 2nd Edition published in 1980 expanded the scope to encompass the Revolutionary Wars and the 3rd edition of 1984 corrected many of the earlier errors and omissions and was the only book in the original series to have a coloured facings chart, and included several of the Ottenfeld pencil drawings, but only saw one very brief print run at the end of that year. The Army of the Austro-Hungarian Army 1798-1814 was always the most popular title of the series, the 1980 edition was reprinted over 40 times.

448 pages

Available on DVD-ROM or as a Digital Download.

wjrawkins-austro-hungarian-army-1792-1814-cover

 

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself

An appetiser

There is a Bavarian Napoleonic battalion that has almost made it’s way to the front and hence this here blog. Really!

Worryingly these lead elements will not fill any prospective commander with anything but apprehension. Where said commander would be looking for a fit, drilled and enthusiastic battalion he instead is presented with casualties. Maybe they’ll recover … given time and scarce medical resources!

front-rank-bavarian-casualties

The rest of the battalion will be along shortly.

Until we meet again. Soonish. Really! …

Salute
von Peter himself

Saxon grenadiers marching from Calpe Towers

A public service announcement …

In his prior post von Peter himself was more than pleased to introduce the latest five packs of Calpe Miniatures French infantry – Light infantry command for the March Attack battalions. But there’s more! Seven new packs of Saxon infantry require unveiling and von Peter himself should really get on with it for the education and betterment of The dear readers!

These packs move the Calpe Miniatures range of Saxon infantry on from purely the line infantry only as they model the Saxon grenadiers. All seven packs are rank and file. That’s 32 unique figures covering the Saxon grenadiers rank and file … and for all we know there may yet be some casualty figures to come. This is a typical Calpe’s expansive approach to a range and one of the reasons that von Peter himself is a self confessed Calpe zealot.

In list format the new packs are …

  • S24 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with covered shakos (6)
  • S25 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with uncovered shakos (6)
  • S26 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with calfskin covered shakos (4)
  • S27 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with covered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)
  • S28 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with calfskin covered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)
  • S29 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with uncovered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)
  • S30 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers head variant pack. Two with forage caps, one bareheaded and one bandaged head (4).

The bracketed number at the end of each descriptor is the number of figures in the pack. And for those not in the know all the figures in a Calpe Miniatures pack are always unique sculpts.

The grumbling grognards that make up a portion of The dear readers will have sagely noted that a Saxon grenadier battalion is constituted of more than just rank and file figures. Quite right. According to those rank and file they may sometimes be of questionable use but if nothing else the officers, non commissioned officers, drummers etc add a bit of visual interest to a battalion. From Calpe Towers …

There will be three command packs made up of drummer, Sapper and two NCOs. The NCO’s will have separate fanions which you can glue to the side of the bayonet. You can then decide whether you want NCOs with or without fanions. The three packs will be the usual covered, calfskin and uncovered shako variants. These are complete but not in moulds yet. There will also be two officer packs. One with covered and the other with uncovered shakos. Each pack will be made up of three foot officers and one mounted officer. There will be two foot officers in each pack in the grey/blue uniform and one in the white. I have not really decided on the mounted officers which are the incomplete elements of these packs. I had just established the poses but not decided on white or blue uniform for these.

Mid September was mentioned regarding the possible availability of these command packs.

Time for the picture show but first the normal caveats …

  • The figures are presented as they arrived excepting that the larger runners inherent in the casting progress have been removed with a craft knife and the fingers of von Peter himself. The same fingers straightened any bent muskets etc
  • the figures have been cunningly rearranged between the front and back photographs so that the figures in the matching front and back photographs match left to right. Ahh … that is to say for example that the figure second on the left is the same figure in the front and back photos. If this has not been adequately explained then don’t worry about it as it probably doesn’t matter. Just be aware that von Peter himself went that extra step in the service of The dear reader
  • von Peter himself has ‘washed’ the figures with ‘Shader Black’ from Coat d’arms to bring out the details a little
  • While marvelling at the figures please remember that they are presented in larger than life size … depending on the dear readers device of course!
  • The English descriptor with each pack has been ‘devised’ by von Peter himself on examining each pack. The pack code identifier is as set by Calpe Miniatures
  • ‘Click’ the photos for a larger and clearer image.

Calpe Saxon S24 Front

Calpe Saxon S24 Back

Above: S24 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with covered shakos (6)

Calpe Saxon S25 Front

Calpe Saxon S25 Back

Above: S25 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with uncovered shakos (6)

Calpe Saxon S26 Front

Calpe Saxon S26 Back

Above: S26 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with calfskin covered shakos (4)

Calpe Saxon S27 Front

Calpe Saxon S27 Back

Above: S27 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with covered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)

Calpe Saxon S28 Front

Calpe Saxon S28 Back

Above: S28 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with calfskin covered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)

Calpe Saxon S29 Front

Calpe Saxon S29 Back

Above: S29 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers with uncovered shakos. Two figures with heads turned and two with greatcoat rolls. (4)

Calpe Saxon S30 Front

Calpe Saxon S30 Back

Above: S30 – March Attack Saxon grenadiers head variant pack. Two with forage caps, one bareheaded and one bandaged head (4).

 Lovely figures but as already stated von Peter himself is a self confessed Calpe zealot.  😇

These figures and the French in the prior post are not yet on the Calpe Miniatures website but von Peter himself is sure that direct contact with Calpe Towers will result in the figures being packaged up and posted out in a most pleasing manner.

And … roll out those Saxon grenadier command packs!  👌

Calpe logo1

Calpe heraldry

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself

Figure and more Calpe figures

Apiata patrols down a street

Above: Willie Apiata on patrol … care of two Good Samaritans. Click for a larger and clearer image

Many moons ago Empress Miniatures had a kick starter or some such similar ‘thing’. As an enticement they offered a special figure available only as part of that kick starterish ‘thing’. That special figure looked remarkably like Willie Apiata as seen in a controversial photograph after an action in Kabul. Apiata was a member of the NZSAS and had already won his Victoria Cross of New Zealand.

“Responding in the aftermath of the January 2010 attacks in Kabul Apiata was photographed by French photojournalist Philip Poupin. Poupin, who did not know Apiata, photographed Apiata and two companions as they were leaving the “thick of the fight” because “They looked like foreign troops and they were tall and had a specific face, they looked tough and strong”.”

Willie Apiata VC in Kabul

Good Samaritan 1: von Peter himself has had a long time long distance electronic relationship with Burkhard of the dhcwargamesblog blog. We comment on each others blogs and have even been known to exchange the occasional email. Somehow Burkhard discovered the admiration von Peter himself had for both Apiata himself and the Empress Miniatures figure of him. In a fit of generosity Burkhard posted his Apiata figure to a most surprised and grateful von Peter himself. This was many many MANY years ago. Burkhard must really have wondered what was going on as a painted Apiata never appeared. Sorry Burkhard … von Peter himself works at a very ‘considered’ pace!  😀

Good Samaritan 2: von Peter himself has never painted anything like modern camouflage and scaling the real thing down to a 28mm figure so that it looked right appeared a little daunting. Fortunately von Peter himself has a good friend who has quite some experience scaling down camouflage to 28mm figures. And so the long suffering Craig undertook to paint the Apiata. In the end Craig painted and based the Apiata at the same time as he did one for himself and von Peter himself could not be more happy.

von Peter himself has no (current!) plans to collect a ‘Modern’ force. WWII is the closest to ‘Moderns’ that is planned. But this does not mean that this trophy figure is not cherished. A huge thank you to both Burkhard and Craig for their generosity. It is well appreciated.

Apiata front Apiata back

Above: Apiata front and back. And don’t forget that this is a 28mm figure

 

More Calpe packs

Calpe Miniatures have some new figure packs. Hurrah! Five new packs for the French and seven for the Saxons. Below are the new French packs. The new Saxons will follow shortly.

The French packs contain Light Infantry command / leader figures for the March Attack French though there is no real reason that they could not also be utilised with the Route March figures.

  • F54 – Light infantry regimental command in uncovered shakos. Pack includes Officer, standard bearer (eagle included), sapper, drummer and two eagle guards.
  • F55 – Light infantry regimental command in covered shakos. Pack includes Officer, standard bearer (eagle included … and it’s a different one to that in F54!), sapper, drummer and two eagle guards.
  • F57 – Light infantry battalion command in covered shakos. Battalion command in uncovered shakos. Officer, drummer, standard, 2 Fourier fanion guards, one senior NCO. Spear point included but not the flag or the flag staff.
  • F58 – Light infantry foot officers in uncovered shakos. Two centre company figures and two flank company officers.
  • F60 – Light infantry foot officers in bicorne. Two centre company figures and two flank company officers.

The less von Peter himself says about these figures the less he is likely to get wrong so it’s time for the pictures. First to repeat the normal caveats regarding these photographs …

  • The figures are presented as they arrived excepting that the larger runners inherent in the casting progress have been removed with a craft knife and the fingers of von Peter himself. The same fingers straightened any bent muskets etc
  • the figures have been cunningly rearranged between the front and back photographs so that the figures in the matching front and back photographs match left to right. Ahh … that is to say for example that the figure second on the left is the same figure in the front and back photos. If this has not been adequately explained then don’t worry about it as it probably doesn’t matter. Just be aware that von Peter himself went that extra step in the service of The dear reader
  • von Peter himself has ‘washed’ the figures with ‘Shader Black’ from Coat d’arms to bring out the details a little
  • While marvelling at the figures please remember that they are presented in larger than life size … depending on the dear readers device of course!
  • The english descriptor with each pack has been ‘devised’ by von Peter himself on examining each pack. The pack code identifier is as set by Calpe Miniatures
  • ‘Click’ the photos for a larger and clearer image.

Calpe French F54 front

Calpe French F54 back

Above: F54 – Light infantry regimental command in uncovered shakos. Pack includes Officer, standard bearer (eagle included), sapper, drummer and two eagle guards.The photo does not do justice to the eagle.

Calpe French F55 front

Calpe French F55 backAbove: F55 – Light infantry regimental command in covered shakos. Pack includes Officer, standard bearer (eagle included … and it’s a different one to that in F54!), sapper, drummer and two eagle guards.

Calpe French F57 front

Calpe French F57 backAbove: F57 – Light infantry battalion command in covered shakos. Battalion command in uncovered shakos. Officer, drummer, standard, 2 Fourier fanion guards, one senior NCO. Spear point included but not the flag or the flag staff. Excuse the blob of metal still attached to the spear point – von Peter himself considers that he is far less likely to loose it if it remains so attached.

Calpe French F58 front

Calpe French F58 backAbove: F58 – Light infantry foot officers in uncovered shakos. Two centre company figures and two flank company officers. The officer on the right as The dear reader observes the screen is holding a pistol.

Calpe French F60 front

Calpe French F60 backAbove: F60 – Light infantry foot officers in bicorne. Two centre company figures and two flank company officers. Once again the officer on the right brandishes a pistol though in one hand this time.

An unforgivable oversight

A couple of posts back in Birthday Bounty von Peter himself was boastfully(!) recapitulating the birthday books that he had accumulated for his birthday. As usual there was a rush to get the post written, checked and out the door. Sadly in that rush two books of a historic bent that also came in the birthday haul were inexcusably missed! And those two books were actually a present from another party and not self organised by the library expanding von Peter himself!

Time to make amends. The son & heir provisioned von Peter’s library with two volumes by C.V. Wedgwood on the English Civil War …

  • The King’s Peace 1637 – 1641
  • The King’s war 1641 – 1647.

Word has it that The son & heir risked life and limb to obtain the books by climbing a rickety ladder in an old style disorganised bookshop to get the books.

So many thanks to The son & heir for the presents — it seems that you can be trusted to shop on the behalf of von Peter himself. And most humble apologies for leaving them off the original post.

The Kig's Peace cover    The King's War cover

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself

Call to Arms 2016 and the religious relic carrying waggon

The local wargames convention – Call to Arms – was held on the weekend of 6 – 7 August 2016. The son & heir and von Peter himself added that touch of celebrity to the proceedings on the Saturday by participating in a Sharp Practice 2 Napoleonic game. Ray provided the scenario and the French with Dan and Michael rounding out the five players involved.

von Peter himself and The son & heir were the first to arrive from our happy band of gamers. It was a cold wintry day outside and initially not much better inside the hall so an empty demonstration table situated under some heating and by the refreshments seemed like a gift from the wargaming gods. As there were no other obvious demonstration tables about it was rapidly claimed. We later learned that it was not our designated table but some other swine had ‘stolen’ our official table so we stayed put. Subsequently we were to discover that the wargaming gods have quite the sense of humour. The temperature about our table rose … and rose … … and rose. We started shedding layers of clothing – but not passed the point of decency The dear reader can be assured! It was not just the battle that was heating up through that day.

The setting was 1814 France, specifically the town and surrounds of St Pierre wherever that is. The action was the culmination of a chase that had been ongoing in one form or another since the godless French looted the holy relics of St. Basil from a church in Holy Russian during the atrocities of 1812. Fortunately for the pursuing Russians the religious relic carrying waggon containing ‘the precious’ has lost a wheel and unfortunately for the French the local blacksmith has fled at the first mention of the word ‘cossack’. This has unsurprisingly added greatly to the difficulties of repairing the religious relic carrying waggon. And wouldn’t you know it the Russians have now appeared. Merde! Can the French repair and extract the waggon before the Russians recover their religious and pricey artefacts?

What follows is a sporadic photo summary of the game. Sporadic because when von Peter himself wasn’t playing the game he was socialising. In between these two activities he would occasionally think to take some photographs. And to add to the challenge those photographs were taken without the aid of a tripod so apologies for their quality.

But first some background for The dear readers …

  • the scenario called for more Russian light cavalry than was available. Fortunately Blücher was not adverse to lending some Prussian cavalry to his Russian allies. Anything to upset the French! Irrespective of how they looked all the Allied cavalry were played as Russian hussars. Those first rank Russian hussars with lances did not get to use them in the game.
  • the religious relic carrying waggon had its own card in the deck. Each time it appeared the French rolled 2 six sided dice and accumulated the score. Once they surpassed a score of 37(?) the religious relic carrying waggon would be adjudged to be repaired. After that the waggon would move as an infantryman on the turn of it’s card.
  • generally the Russians were men who had well learned their military trade through the wars whereas some of the French were recently called to the colours.
  • for the uninitiated a ‘Group’ is the base unit of infantry and cavalry in Sharp Practice. They have no real formation. Multiple Groups can join together to make a ‘Formation’. No surprisingly Formations have a formation, e.g. a line, column, square etc. Formations fight much better but being in set formations they are more difficult to manoeuvre around the battlefield. The terminology may be  a little confusing but it all seems to work just fine. 😃
  • whether it be a Group or a Formation nothing works terribly well without the fearless and occasionally knowledgeable and professional Leaders. Leaders of various rankings and effectiveness are crucial to the game.
  • the aim of the game is for the Russians to capture a hopefully repaired religious relic carrying wagon and retrieve it to their lines. The French are to repair and extract the wagon off their baseline and speed it on its way to Paris. Neither side were allowed to ‘damage’ the religious relic carrying wagon. The Russians in no way wish to damage the precious and priceless cargo and the French need an operational wagon if it’s contents are to avoid the Russians and reach Paris.

CTA 2016 1Above: an over view of most of the table early in the game from behind the Russian lines. Click the image to see a larger and clearer view which amy help to make sense of the following.

Starting in the bottom left corner we can see four of the six groups of Russian/Allied cavalry. Only the last of these are actual Russian hussars though the Leader to be seen here is also Russian. The lead Group out on their own are playing as a Group. The last three are clumped together in a Formation. Two other groups of actual Russian hussars were at the far end of the Russian line out of sight and they were destined to have quite a day. The Russian cavalry operated under Dan’s – or should that be Danski’s – command.

Moving left along the Russian battle line we have six Groups of Russian jagers under the Command of The son & heir. One Group is a little tardy and has yet to cross the bridge. An attached officer of the Garde Cossacks is chiding them along to join their comrades on the firing line. The rest of them have made it to the edge of the wood and have begun to take French in St Pierre under fire. The gunpowder smoke … errr … cotton wool shows that the far Formation of three groups have fired but not yet reloaded. The large rectangular stand behind the furthest jagers represents the Russians high commander who laboured was under The son & heirs control.

Further along the Russian line can be seen the beginnings of the six groups of Russian musketeers suffering under the well camouflaged military talents of von Peter himself.

The overall infantry plan was for the jagers to pin the French while the musketeers went for the far end of St Pierre or even a hook around behind it depending on that religious relic carrying wagon.

For the French we have light infantry in the fields on this side of St Pierre. They appear to have cheated and have brought along a single 6pdr cannon! Outrageous and against all the rules of the small wars. But what does one expect?!  😃

To their rear and partially obscured by the trees are four Groups of French dragoons. They were positioned centrally behind St Pierre but are reacting to the presence of the Russian cavalry on the Russian left.

St Pierre itself is garrisoned by perhaps five(?) Groups of French infantry in the various buildings facing the Russian threat. Two Groups occupy the buildings and courtyard on the nearest corner of St Pierre. A further two groups can be see lining the wall opposite the Russian Jagers and another Group lurks in the building to their rear.

In the middle of St Pierre The dear reader may be able to make out a white blob. This is a die sitting atop the religious relic carrying wagon representing the amount of repairs the French have affected.

Finally two Groups of French infantry have advanced out of St Pierre and lined the wall guarding the far flank of the town.

The father and son combination of Ray and Michael ran the French. It’s not really their fault. von Peter himself is fully aware that somebodies had to do it!!  😃

CTA 2016 2Above: The same early stage of the game from behind the French lines. The religious relic carrying wagon with its extra load of the repair counting die is much more visible here. For their first two religious relic carrying wagon repair rolls the French somehow managed to a roll ten … and then another ten! And these both under the close scrutiny of von Peter himself!! Highly suspect. You never know what shenanigans the French have pulled.  😃

CTA 2016 3Above: Oh dear but we appear to be still at the same point early on in the game. A closer up view of the almost complete Russian eager firing line. Still missing are the single Group of jagers on the other side of the bridge with the Garde Cossack officer – see the first picture. The large rectangular base just behind the jagers at the near end of the line is the Russian CinC under the control of The son & heir.

At the far end of the line is Father Disputin acting as one of the Russian commanders. Good luck keeping the fire breathing Father out of the battle. He’s come a long way to reclaim the relics and if their recovery requires the forwarding of assorted French souls to their maker then so be it.

CTA 2016 4Above: At last the game report moves on. Danski has moved the two Groups of Russian hussars on the Russian right down the flank and engaged in several melees. Prior to this image with the cunning use of four Command Cards Dan gained an extra move for his hussars and eradicated a Group of French infantry by pouncing on their flank. Almost as importantly the hussars also potted the French Leader – number two in the French military hierarchy. Huzzah!

The French managed to form a new line of infantry just in front of the lead Group of hussars in the image. Undaunted Dan drove a Group of his hussars onward and defeated these too. The remains of the French infantry can be seen further down the road cowering behind the religious relic carrying wagon. The hussars scored another French Leader by downing the top ranked French leader this time! And yes that is the religious relic carrying wagon just ahead of the hussars. HUZZAH!!

Sadly for the Russian heroes there was French infantry in the red tile roofed building just ahead and to the left. The vengeful French fire was to see the one – or was it two? – remaining hussars rushing to the rear to errr … reform their ranks! Huzzah.

CTA 2016 5Above: And some time passed. Despite ongoing alarms the French completed the repairs to the religious relic carrying wagon and started to move it away from the Russians and towards Paris. Seeing an opportunity and goading the attached Garde Cossack Leader with tales of daring do The son & heir managed to grab the religious relic carrying wagon with fast moving group of jager and their attached glory seeking Garde Cossack. The image shows the situation a little after the religious relic carrying wagon has changed hands. The Russians have turned the wagon around and desperately want it to move out of St Pierre. There are a lot of converging French around.

CTA 2016 6Above: A zoomed out view of the previous image showing the audaciousness of the Russian coup de main … and a tape measure. D’oh!

Several other points of interest for the dedicated follower of miniature military simulation. Moving along the top of the image left to right …

  • the two lance armed Russian hussars by the card deck aren’t really there. They are ex-hussars waiting to go back into their storage container as their day is done.
  • von Peter himself has managed to get his Russian musketeers sort of across the field, merged them into what he hopes is a scary looking Formation of four Groups and is looking to unleash them on some hopefully weakened Frenchmen somewhere. This is the blob coming in at an angle against St Pierre. If The dear reader is wondering whatever happened to the other two Groups of Russian musketeers they can just be made out at the far left of the image between the red tiled roof and the edge of the image. They are looking to open a second front against St. Pierre or make an opportunistic end run around St Pierre as circumstances present themselves.
  • a Formation of jagers has advanced out of the woods. This was occasioned by the French getting the wagon moving and a sense of “Holy Mother Russia!” descending on the Russian command. There was a palpable sense that the plan needed to kick up a gear. It was from this Formation that the brave Garde Cossack Leader and his jagers made their dash for the religious relic carrying wagon.
  • between the afore mentioned jagers Formation and St Pierre there can be seen a build up of smoke – alright some cotton wool! It represents the smoke resulting from “Firing Random Event”. Firing through this smoke was adjudicated with an additional minus one to hit.
  • to the right of the advancing jager Formation and behind the trees can be made out some rapidly removing themselves to the rear Russian jagers. They had been jumped by some Frenchmen on the outskirts of St Pierre who managed to sneak up and attack the jagers in the flank. To their credit the jagers have not abandoned the unconscious Father Disputin but are carrying him rapidly to the rear. One can but feel only pity for those jagers should Father Disputin rouse himself to consciousness.

CTA 2016 7Above: The scene about the religious relic carrying wagon shortly after the prior image. The religious relic carrying wagon has just been re-appropriated by the French. The Russian jagers are muttering mutterings that are best left untranslated but not so much because they have just lost the religious relic carrying wagon but because just out of shot to the right are some French dragoons aimed down the road at them.

CTA 2016 8Above: A zoomed out image of the prior scene. The blob of Russian musketeers has managed to clear the outskirts of St Pierre of Frenchmen in a most thorough and prejudiced manner. von Peter himself was dreaming of his undoubted promotion and military decoration at this point!

The French dragoons can just be made out in the top right corner.

CTA 2016 9Above: And so we have reached the end of game photos. It is at this stage that the martial vigour of French began to fail as they surveyed the scene around St Pierre. And Monsieur Ray had another pressing social engagement to attend. Sure! 😃

Although they once again possess the religious relic carrying wagon the French have yet to turn it around … and they know that this is a time intensive activity. von Peter’s large Formation of musketeers have lined up both the religious relic carrying wagon and the escorting skirmishing Frenchmen while his second smaller Formation of musketeers – bottom’ish right – is poised to attack the Frenchmen in the red tiled roofed building to keep them out of the main action. The surviving Russian jagers partially hidden by the trees to the left of the image are ready to support the musketeers. Danski’s Russian hussars survey the scene down the road at the right edge of the image.

CTA 2016 10Above: End of game 2. The Garde Cossack Leader and his hardy Russian jagers breathed a sigh of relief as their card turned before that of the French dragoons and have dived into the thatched and slate tiled buildings next to the red tile roofed building. They hope to cause the French a little pain from here and feel much safer with those French dragoons loitering on the road. And there’s still that tape measure to admire. Double d’oh!

CTA 2016 11Above: The end position of the cavalry ballet on the outskirts of St Pierre. The perplexing military conundrum here was that the stream though innocuous looking was actually a significant obstacle with steep slippery banks. To cross it would take a complete turn which in turn would leave any cavalry at a disadvantage should the enemy cavalry manage to attack them immediately they had crossed the stream. But to ignore the opposing cavalry and move elsewhere would be to invite that opposing cavalry to cross the stream unopposed. Lovely tape measure!  🚫

All in all a successful days gaming played in a stress free laid back manner. Many thanks to my fellow gamers … even the French ones! 😃 And we learned Sharp Practice 2 a little more which is a definite bonus. Several passers by had nice things to say about the game so a big thank you to them as well. It was great talking to you all.

Many thanks to Ray for sorting the scenario when the rest of us didn’t. It may have been based on someone else’s scenario in which case thank you to them as well.

Don’t forget to click on the images for a larger and clearer view.

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself

Birthday bounty

Another birthday has come and gone. And the number associated with that event has risen to become quite alarmingly large. But what can one do except begin to count down to the next even higher numbered birthday!  💀

As is the way at Neu Schloss von Peter the time honoured tradition of von Peter himself organising the bulk of his own presents was … well … honoured! Who else could possibly know the deep desires of the great man?! This year the deep desires turned out to be a benefit show for the world famous Neu Schloss von Peter Library.

The first two books may have been mentioned in this here blog before. At last they now reside in the Neu Schloss von Peter Library.

Napoleon and the struggle for Germany. The Franco-Prussian War of 1813. Volume II: The Defeat of Napoleon to give it its full title follows on from Napoleon and the struggle for Germany. The Franco-Prussian War of 1813. Volume I: The War of Liberation, Spring 1813. With the acquisition of volume II the complete set is now in the possession of von Peter himself. There is quite a marked difference in page count between the two books with the respective volumes coming in at 488 and 887 respectively. Perhaps this is not so surprising when one considers the activity pre and post the 1813 armistice.

Michael V. Leggiere has crept into the affections of von Peter himself as a favoured author and so the reading of these tomes is much anticipated. Yes – shockingly the implication of the prior sentence is true. Volume I is yet to be read. There is a backlog of reading to be read … which is why so many books have been purchased?!!  👀

Napoleon and the Struggle for Germany vol 2

As all of The dear readers should be aware the greatest year of interest in things Napoleonic is 1813 for von Peter himself. So what is one to do when a book entitled Napoleon 1813 Decision at Bautzen by a reputable author is released. Why purchase a copy of course.

Napoleon 1813 - Decision at Bautzen

Not quite Napoleonic but still Horse and Musket. When von Peter himself reintroduced himself to wargaming after his university days one of his first projects was 28mm Seven Years War. Great was the satisfaction derived from this project as Prussian and Austrian adversaries were collected. For now the figures are detained in their ‘barracks’ but their day will come again quite possibly using either Sharp Practice 2 or perhaps Honours of War. von Peter himself has heard many intriguing – in a good way – things of this Osprey published rule set. Besides – von Peter himself is ever curious regarding rule systems.

Honours of War

And now for something completely different. The most dedicated of The dear readers will be aware that von Peter himself has a Late Roman army buried in his reserves of unpigmented figures. For von Peter himself the experience of researching an ancients army is quite different to the that of researching a horse and musket army. So when a book was discovered that would perhaps enhance the local understanding of the Late Roman Army … and with the implicit permission granted to obtain said book because the birthday purchase scheme was still in operation … said book was rapidly ordered. The Late Roman Army now resides in the hobby library of Neu Schloss von Peter as do all the other books mentioned above. Now the challenge will be to get them read.

Tha Late Roman Army book cover

 

The Great Wargaming Survey – 2016

von Peter himself computes that this is the third time that those happy go lucky chaps and chapesses(?) at the Wargames, Soldiers & Strategy magazine have come eliciting wargamers views on their hobby. In both prior instances they have fed back their findings which if nothing else have been of curiosity interest. It took the normally indecisive von Peter himself only a few minutes to complete the survey so it is not a big investment in time … and there are inducements in the form of prizes and a 5 euro gift certificate … …

You can get at the survey from here.

great wargaming survey 3

A Sharp Practice 2 warm up game

The local Call to Arms wargames convention is scheduled for the 6 & 7 August 2016 here in Wellington, New Zealand. Raymond and von Peter himself have for quite a while had an understanding that they would host a demonstration game of Sharp Practice 2 at the convention. A couple of weeks ago it slowly dawned on us that the convention really wasn’t that far off. At least Raymond had managed to play a few games of Sharp Practice 2. von Peter himself had managed to read through the rules but had not actually played them. Obviously we needed a game so that we would at least be on the same page with the rules on the day.

Raymond hosted and we played the “Fondler’s Duke” scenario from the Too Fat Lardies “The Compleat Fondler” scenario book. This is an all cavalry affair from the Hundred Days Campaign. Our hero Dick Fondler is with the Brunswick Hussars and is trying to make contact with the Prussians. The Prussians are trying to keep the road running the length of the table open so that Wellington’s Army can march to their assistance as agreed – good luck with that! 😄 The French have orders to take the village of Thyle – through which the afore mentioned road runs – and detect any allied activity in the area. As mentioned every figure in the game sits astride a horse.

Four – rising to five – of us played the game. The son & heir, Dan and eventually Michael were the misguided French dancing to the tune of that emperor. Raymond and von Peter himself waved the flag for the good guys. The game had its ups and downs for both sides but at the end it was ups for the French and down for the Allies. As one of the last acts of the game von Peter himself arranged for Dick Fondler to lead a decisive charge of the Brunswick Hussars into some French dragoons. The French were decisively beaten with many slaughtered … but unfortunately and not part of the plan so was Dick Fondler. Oops!

The game had been fun and most importantly the rules – to some degree at least – learnt at the practical level of pushing figures around the table. Now to sort the scenario for next weekends convention game.

Sharpe Practice 2 at Rays

Above: Nearing the end of the game at Raymond’s. The infantry are dismounted cavalry recently pushed back from the banks of the river. Unbeknown to himself Fondler is breathing his last few breaths just on the other side of the river as he readies the Brunswick Hussars for a glorious charge. Oops!

 

By the way – it’s not too late to send birthday presents. von Peter himself is not so proud as to have a cut off date for their receipt!  😄

Until we meet again …

Salute
von Peter himself